SKIN SUSTAINABILITY

By Deanna Hagan

By Deanna Hagan

skin sustainability

The conversation around Sustainability isn’t a new topic but in the recent years it has spearheaded a change in thoughts and attitude in and around the industry. In December 2019, Allure published an article by Marci Robin, covering beauty trends over the last decade and a point that stuck out was “Skin Care is Cool Again”. With skincare being a focus for many of us, we are investing more and more time, energy and money in ensuring our skin is at its best at all times. This investment wasn’t necessarily a focus years before and what it projects for the future is that we not only will be investing in it for the long haul but that we will also be making conscious efforts and choices towards “Skin Sustainability” through products, branding and experience.

From a wider understanding, there was no question as to the focus on environmental impacts from the fashion and beauty world in regards to Sustainability. The 2020 January issue of Vogue Italia had only illustrated editorials and no photography in an attempt to reduce its carbon emission for the purpose of campaigns and editorial shoots. Vogue Mexico delivered a “green” issue as their first of 2020. These clear efforts from other areas of the industry stirred a need for resolution within my own resolves and what they would be and how to implement them. Establishing that materialism is temporal and deceptively satiating, it’s maybe time to rethink luxury and beauty.

As a makeup artist, I’ve always come from a “skin first” perspective. Seeking out beauty products that facilitate and simplify achieving that precise clean and glowing look.

As time passes, and more products arrive on the marketplace, it gets overwhelmingly complicated to weed through all the information, both written and visual. So, I’ve decided to start by focusing on being loyal to the regime that is working for me and is a top-quality product (clean beauty is a luxury) whilst researching new products, reading about scientific updates and contributing to better eco-friendly packaging ideas. Looking toward the future, I see how addressing the above can lead to some results with common concerns of skin consciousness and consumerism.

Leading with concerns around skin consciousness and consumerism, small but mighty efforts can be made towards improving sustainability and mass consumption. Even as a make-up artist at the centre of so many beauty releases and products, focusing on using less can still be an effort to a more skin sustaining environment. For the cover of the January issue of Vogue Latin America, I intentionally simplified the makeup, prepping with the 111SKIN Rose Gold Brightening Facial Treatment Mask and Costa Brazil Oleo Para a Face and for colour using a pigment as both a face oil, binder and illuminator. I intentionally applied no foundation, contour, powder, blush, mascara, eyeliner or lipstick and focused on more hybrid techniques like Nihonga as a natural way to mix pigments to create the colour instead of opting for a full make-up kit to create a similar effect.

Whilst we are actively trying to save the planet, there is proven research suggested that the less we consume the greater our mental and physical health. Nneka Leiba, VP of Healthy Living Science at the Environmental Working Group (EWG) speaks about the stress the body takes from the high consumption of beauty products, many of which contain harmful ingredients (formaldehyde, Mercury, phthalates and parabens) and are still surprisingly in high consumption around hair and beauty products. In particular, cosmetics, including hair products, marketed to black women are some of the biggest culprits with phthalates and parabens known to be hormonal disrupters.

Could luxury mean simplifying our beauty processes and streamlining product consumption? As women come to understand their skin and its needs better, they can be more focused on choosing products to fulfil those needs specifically and the results will be more successful. 111SKIN believes in just tailoring products that you need in your routine and what your skin will benefit from ,with targeted ranges that span across Intensity for mature skin, Clarity for blemish prone skin and Regenerative for energizing tired and lacklustre skin, the approach is simple and the results, successful, in delivering a customized and yet sustainable approach to skincare.

As my pledge this year, I will be experimenting with different foundations and tinted moisturizers that are free of preservatives and silicones (Westman Atelier and Beauty Counters are said to be excellent). I’ll look for ways to mix natural pigments with binders (Costa Brazil Oleo para a Face). I’ll use a mascara without preservatives and toxic color (like coal tar dyes aka Aminophenol, Diaminobenzene or Phenylenediamine). I’ve already switched hair care products (using Act+ Acre and Maria Nila). I intend to continue to incorporate clean beauty products into my kit and work with brands to support a reduction in wasteful packaging. Check out La Bouche Rouge for their take on luxury lipsticks. I love my 111SKIN Master Masking Edit that stores a collection of my favourite sheet masks whilst reducing packaging consumption, an even better bonus is that the Bio-Cellulose Facial Treatment Mask is bio-degradable!

In Allure’s final issue of the decade, they declared it the year of “Skin Care is Cool Again” and I couldn’t agree more.

From a wider understanding, there was no question as to the focus on environmental impacts from the fashion and beauty world in regard to Sustainability. The 2020 January issue of Vogue Italia had only illustrated editorials and no photography in an attempt to reduce its carbon emission for the purpose of campaigns and editorial shoots. Vogue Mexico delivered a “green” issue as their first of 2020. These clear efforts from other areas of the industry stirred a need for resolution within my own resolves and what they would be and how to implement them. Establishing that materialism is temporal and deceptively satiating, it’s maybe time to rethink luxury and beauty.

As a makeup artist, I’ve always come from a “skin first” perspective. Seeking out beauty products that facilitate and simplify achieving that precise clean and glowing look.

As time passes, and more products arrive on the marketplace, it gets overwhelmingly complicated to weed through all the information, both written and visual. So, I’ve decided to start by focusing on being loyal to the regime that is working for me and is a top-quality product (clean beauty is a luxury) whilst researching new products, reading about scientific updates and contributing to better eco-friendly packaging ideas. Looking toward the future, I see how addressing the above can lead to some results with common concerns of skin consciousness, consumerism.

Leading with concerns around skin consciousness and consumerism, small but mighty efforts can be made towards improving sustainability and mass consumption. Even as a make-up artist at the center of so many beauty releases and products, focusing on using less can still be an effort to a more skin sustaining environment. For the cover of the January issue of Vogue Latin America, I intentionally simplified the makeup, prepping with the 111SKIN Rose Gold Brightening Facial Treatment Mask and Costa Brazil Oleo Para a Face and for colour using a pigment as both a face oil, binder and illuminator. I intentionally applied no foundation, contour, powder, blush, mascara, eyeliner or lipstick and focused on more hybrid techniques like Nihonga as a natural way to mix pigments to create the colour instead of opting for a full make-up kit to create a similar effect.

Whilst we are actively trying to save the planet, there is proven research suggested that the less we consume the greater our mental and physical health. Nneka Leiba, VP of Healthy Living Science at the Environmental Working Group (EWG) speaks about the stress the body takes from the high consumption of beauty products, many of which contain harmful ingredients (formaldehyde, Mercury, phthalates and parabens) and are still surprisingly in high consumption around hair and beauty products. In particular, cosmetics, including hair products, marketed to black women are some of the biggest culprits with phthalates and parabens known to be hormonal disrupters.

Could luxury mean simplifying our beauty processes and streamlining product consumption? As women come to understand their skin and its needs better, they can be more focused on choosing products to fulfil those needs specifically and the results will be more successful. 111SKIN believes in just tailoring products that you need into your routine and what your skin will benefit from ,with targeted ranges that span across Intensity for mature skin, Clarity for blemish prone skin and Regenerative for energizing tired and lacklustre skin, the approach is simple and the results, successful, in delivering a customized and yet sustainable approach to skincare.

As my pledge this year, I will be experimenting with different foundations and tinted moisturizers that are free of preservatives and silicones (Westman Atelier and Beauty Counters are said to be excellent). I’ll look for ways to mix natural pigments with binders (Costa Brazil Oleo para a Face). I’ll use a mascara without preservatives and toxic color (like coal tar dyes aka Aminophenol, Diaminobenzene or Phenylenediamine). I’ve already switched hair care products (using Act+ Acre and Maria Nila). I intend to continue to incorporate clean beauty products into my kit and work with brands to support a reduction in wasteful packaging. Check out La Bouche Rouge for their take on luxury lipsticks. I love my 111SKIN Master Masking Edit that stores a collection of my favourite sheet masks whilst reducing packaging consumption, an even better bonus is that the Bio-Cellulose Facial Treatment Mask is bio-degradable!

In Allure’s final issue of the decade, they declared it the year of “Skin Care is Cool Again” and I couldn’t agree more.

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