Photo: Maria Eugênia Caminha

Perfecting your Pregnancy-Friendly Skincare Routine

Maria Eugênia Caminha

Anticipating the changes pregnancy brings is an overwhelming thought and your skincare routine may have been at the bottom of that list. A routine that you may have already mastered whilst bump-free, is suddenly a step that also needs adjusting. More than likely you would have been advised to swap some products in order to fight common pregnancy-related issues such as hyperpigmentation and excessive sebum production, but do not worry! We advise the best way for that glowing & desired complexion most pregnant women experience.

Disclaimer: always consult your trusted doctor prior investing on any skincare items.

 


PURITY MATTERS.

A gentle skincare routine is advised, as pregnancy enhances skin sensitivity and hormonal fluctuations. Our Co-Founder Eva Alexandridis, when pregnant with her second child, made sure 111SKIN developed a specific anti-ageing range with zero unnecessary additives. Our Reparative collection is designed to heal and recover with an easy, as pure as can be formula.

“When I was pregnant, I still wanted to use effective anti-ageing products.
Then we
formulated the Reparative collection, which is silicon and paraben-free.
I believe
in the power of simple,
yet effective formulas”

- Eva Alexandridis, 111SKIN Co-Founder

Having this focus in mind, our experts advise to you not experiment with your routine as it can end up irritating your skin and making it more susceptible to external factors such as the climate and pollution.


ACIDS ARE A DELICATE SUBJECT.

  • Poly-Hydroxy Acids (PHAs), heroes for sensitive and oily skin, they are ideal for their much larger molecules which cannot penetrate the skin too deeply – think gentle exfoliation. The most common PHAs are gluconolactone, galactose, and lactobionic acid.

 

  • Alpha Hydroxy Acids (AHAs), however, are a bit more intense. Generally preferred for normal to dry skin, they are used to enhance natural moisturising factors and exfoliate dead cells. Mandelic, glycolic and lactic acid also have clarifying properties.

 

It is important to clarify that you should always get your doctor's approval in order to amend your skincare routine, mainly because some ingredients are controversial amongst health professionals.


DOSE THEM RIGHT.

  • Certain actives are considered safe at specific concentrations. Benzoyl Peroxide, for example, can be used at 5% concentrations or lower.

 

  • Salicylic Acid, if used as localised treatment for spots, at 2% or lower – make sure to avoid applying it to your whole face.

 

  • Creams containing Glycolic Acid and Vitamin C, at less than 10% concentrations, are also good options.

NOURISH LIKE A PRO.

They always seem to be great options due to their natural properties, but even essential oils can be problematic for mums-to-be. Still use your aroma diffuser but make sure to choose the right scents.

  • Jasmine and clary sage oils are known for working particularly well during labour – you definitely do not want to indulge on those during your early stages, so be alert and avoid them altogether.

 

  • Instead, invest on gentler fragrances such as eucalyptus, tea tree, chamomile and ylang ylang.


If you prefer to stick to more consistent formulas, feel free to use oils containing shea butter, cocoa butter and vitamin E.


PIGMENTATION IS A NO-NO.

Not only are your hormones spiralling, but pigment-producing cells also get a boost during pregnancy. In order to avoid all kinds of skin burns and melasma, those darkened patches which can pop all over your face, you can…

  • avoid getting a skin-burn reaction or some level of discoloration triggered by oils such as lime, lemon, coriander, bergamot, dill and fennel

 

  • always make sure to apply SPF 30 to 50 every two hours or so. Broad-spectrum sunscreens, which protect from both UVA and UVB rays, are definitely the best option. Oil-free and comedogenic formulas are even better, as no one wants to deal with a very hormonal acne-prone skin longer than necessary.

 


AND, FINALLY, SWAP THOSE OUT.

  • If pregnant, absolutely no oral retinoids (vitamin A) should be part of your skincare routine. There is a reason why dermatologists can only prescribe those if you are not pregnant or planning on having children: congenital malformations are a massive risk. Even topical options should be avoided, as information around their use is still subjective.

 

  • Brightening formulas containing arbutin, kojic acid and hydroquinone should be avoided – again, increasing the chances of hyperpigmentation is everything you want to steer clear from.

 

  • Remember: skincare is a full-body concern. Pthalates, synthetical chemicals present in products such as hairsprays and deodorants, can increase the risk of miscarriages and gestational diabetes.

PURITY MATTERS.

A gentle skincare routine is advised, as pregnancy enhances skin sensitivity and hormonal fluctuations. Our Co-Founder Eva Alexandridis, when pregnant with her second child, made sure 111SKIN developed a specific anti-ageing range with zero unnecessary additives. Our Reparative collection is designed to heal and recover with an easy, as pure as can be formula.

“When I was pregnant, I still wanted to use effective anti-ageing products.
Then we
formulated the Reparative collection, which is silicon and paraben-free.
I believe
in the power of simple,
yet effective formulas”

- Eva Alexandridis, 111SKIN Co-Founder

Having this focus in mind, our experts advise to you not experiment with your routine as it can end up irritating your skin and making it more susceptible to external factors such as the climate and pollution.

ACIDS ARE A DELICATE SUBJECT.

  • Poly-Hydroxy Acids (PHAs), heroes for sensitive and oily skin, they are ideal for their much larger molecules which cannot penetrate the skin too deeply – think gentle exfoliation. The most common PHAs are gluconolactone, galactose, and lactobionic acid.

 

  • Alpha Hydroxy Acids (AHAs), however, are a bit more intense. Generally preferred for normal to dry skin, they are used to enhance natural moisturising factors and exfoliate dead cells. Mandelic, glycolic and lactic acid also have clarifying properties.

 

It is important to clarify that you should always get your doctor's approval in order to amend your skincare routine, mainly because some ingredients are controversial amongst health professionals.

DOSE THEM RIGHT.

  • Certain actives are considered safe at specific concentrations. Benzoyl Peroxide, for example, can be used at 5% concentrations or lower.

 

  • Salicylic Acid, if used as localised treatment for spots, at 2% or lower – make sure to avoid applying it to your whole face.

 

  • Creams containing Glycolic Acid and Vitamin C, at less than 10% concentrations, are also good options.

NOURISH LIKE A PRO.

They always seem to be great options due to their natural properties, but even essential oils can be problematic for mums-to-be. Still use your aroma diffuser but make sure to choose the right scents.

  • Jasmine and clary sage oils are known for working particularly well during labour – you definitely do not want to indulge on those during your early stages, so be alert and avoid them altogether.

 

  • Instead, invest on gentler fragrances such as eucalyptus, tea tree, chamomile and ylang ylang.


If you prefer to stick to more consistent formulas, feel free to use oils containing shea butter, cocoa butter and vitamin E.

PIGMENTATION IS A NO-NO.

Not only are your hormones spiralling, but pigment-producing cells also get a boost during pregnancy. In order to avoid all kinds of skin burns and melasma, those darkened patches which can pop all over your face, you can…

  • avoid getting a skin-burn reaction or some level of discoloration triggered by oils such as lime, lemon, coriander, bergamot, dill and fennel

 

  • always make sure to apply SPF 30 to 50 every two hours or so. Broad-spectrum sunscreens, which protect from both UVA and UVB rays, are definitely the best option. Oil-free and comedogenic formulas are even better, as no one wants to deal with a very hormonal acne-prone skin longer than necessary.

 

AND, FINALLY, SWAP THOSE OUT.

  • If pregnant, absolutely no oral retinoids (vitamin A) should be part of your skincare routine. There is a reason why dermatologists can only prescribe those if you are not pregnant or planning on having children: congenital malformations are a massive risk. Even topical options should be avoided, as information around their use is still subjective.

 

  • Brightening formulas containing arbutin, kojic acid and hydroquinone should be avoided – again, increasing the chances of hyperpigmentation is everything you want to steer clear from.

 

  • Remember: skincare is a full-body concern. Pthalates, synthetical chemicals present in products such as hairsprays and deodorants, can increase the risk of miscarriages and gestational diabetes.